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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
what you said is a little off from what we're hearing here in washington. >> i think there is definitely been a big focus on wireless and what the capability is. we're out there in the world today and understand that the spectrum limitations are real. engineers will tell you about that, that it just can't deliver the kind of band width that we need to really accomplish the goals that businesses and consumers want in their homes. and so what we're trying to do at the u.s.t.a. is constantly remind people without the wired network you're not going to have the wireless network. so the policy makers i think understand it better than ever that you need fiber facilities into these cell towers in order to enable them to carry broad band at faster and faster speeds which and you need better access to broad band capables in the home. >> jeff gardner is president and c.e.o. of the wind stream corporation and he is chairman of us telecom. >> we talked about universal service fund reform and one issue facing the f.c.c. right now is how to pay for this fund going forward. they took
here in washington. >> guest: well, i think there's definitely been a big focus on wireless, and what the capability is. we're out there in the world today and understand that the spectrum limitations are real. engineers tell you about that, you just can't deliver the bandwidth we need to really accomplish the goals that businesses and consumers want in their homes, and so what we're trying to do at is constantly remind people without the wired network, you're not going to have the wireless network, and so the policymakers, i think, understand it better than ever that you need fiber facilities into these cell towers in order to enable them to carry broadband at fastst -- faster and faster speeds and capabilities in the home. >> host: jeff gardner is president and ceo of the windstream corporation, and he, this year is, chairman of the group u.s. telecom, and john barbagallo is with bloomberg. >> one issue is how to pay for the fund going forward. there was a step in reorienting the fund to support broadband service rather than telephone service, and for years while the funds supported
in our washington studio is paul barbagallo of bloomberg. professor noll, first of all, what was your role or activity during the breakup of at&t, and what led to that decision? >> guest: well, the roots of the antitrust case were in a presidential task force that was formed during the johnson administration in the late 1960s called the telecommunications policy task force. it had concluded that the telecommunications industry, at least the part of it that was in the federal jurisdiction, could be competitive and made recommendations both to the -- mainly to the federal communications commission about how to cause that to happen. then when the nixon administration came along, the holdover staff in the antitrust division after watching for a couple of years decided to pursue antitrust rather than fcc regulation as the means to introduce competition. my role was that i was on both the telecommunications policy task force, and i was one of the outside economists advising the department of justice during the mid '70s when the case was actually being shaped. >> host: and professor hausman?
to be a separate business. there are always people arguing in washington. but if you actually look, the latest government statistics are 32% of the people don't even have landline telephones anymore. they use cell phones. the competition out there, in terms of the internet. 4-g is coming in. i would be willing to predict that in 10 or 15 years, the majority of youth on the internet will be over mobile phones and cell phones throughout the world. >> host: if you expand that to wireless devices so you don't limit it to cell phones -- >> guest: that's what i mean. tablets, you name it, exactly. >> host: i think the really important point about your question is that the mindset of the world well into the mid-1990s was that wireline access was stuck on poles or buried in the ground was the key to understanding competition in telecommunications. the intriguing part of the wireless story is how very few people inside the industry -- that that is why the mckenzie mckinsey report listed, it wasn't just judge green and the fcc who did not understand the potential of wireless. it was the entire industry,
in the washington studio is paul. professor noll, first of all, what with your activity during the breakup of at&t and what led to that decision? >> the antitrust case was formed during the johnson administration the late 1960's and a presidential task force called the telecommunications policy task force. it concluded the telecommunications industry, the part in federal jurisdiction, should be competitive and made recommendations both -- mainly to the fcc about how to cause that to happen. then when the knicks and the administration can along, the holdover staff of the antitrust division decided to pursue it antitrust rather than it fcc regulation as the means to introduce competition. i was on both the telecommunication policy task force and i was one of the outside economists advising the department of justice during the mid-1970s when the case was actually being shipped. >> professor hausman? >> i did not come into the proceeding until 1982, and thereafter when the antitrust division decided to review it about three years later the effect of the breakup, there was a report that was done, and
chu of "washington journal." in a few moments on the communicators from a look at how hurricane sandy effective emergency communications. in 40 minutes, it chief justice john roberts on the supreme court and constitutional law. and while looking at china's political and economic and military power, and another on the situation in syria. >> one of the major effects on hurricane sandy was on telecommunications. that is our topic today on "the communicators." christopher guttman-mccabe is our guest today. mr. christopher guttman-mccabe, overall, what was the effect of hurricane sandy on your organization, verizon, sprint, at&t and etc. >> guest: thank you. i wouldn't mind taking a step back and providing a little perspective on this storm and the impact it had. mayor bloomberg said that the damage was unprecedented. but it may be the worst storm that the city has ever faced. and the previous title search, it was 14 feet. governor chris christie said the damage was unthinkable. we have buyers. we had hurricane force winds. we had massive flooding and if you look at that in the flooding of
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)